Oracle DBA – A lifelong learning experience

ASM – WARNING: Deprecated privilege SYSDBA for command xxx

Posted by John Hallas on December 12, 2008

The error message WARNING: Deprecated privilege SYSDBA for command ‘ALTER DISKGROUP MOUNT’ can be seen in an asm alert log if the command has been run as a sysdba user rather than a sysasm user

From the Oracle manual :-

SYSASM is a system privilege that enables the separation of the SYSDBA database administration privilege from the ASM storage administration privilege. Access to the SYSASM privilege is granted by membership in an operating system group that is designated as the OSASM group. This is similar to SYSDBA and SYSOPER privileges, which are system privileges granted through membership in the groups designated as the OSDBA and OSOPER operating system groups. You can designate one group for all of these system privileges, or you can designate separate groups for each operating system privilege.

You can divide system privileges during ASM installation, so that database administrators, storage administrators, and database operators each have distinct operating system privilege groups. Use the Custom Installation option to designate separate operating system groups as the operating system authentication groups for privileges on ASM. Table 3-1 lists the operating system authentication groups for ASM, and the privileges that their members are granted:

Table 3-1 Operating System Authentication Groups for ASM

Group

Privilege Granted to Members

OSASM

SYSASM privilege, which provides full administrative privilege for the ASM instance.

OSDBA for ASM

SYSDBA privilege on the ASM instance. This privilege grants access to data stored on ASM, and in the current release, grants the SYSASM administrative privileges.

OSOPER for ASM

SYSOPER privilege on the ASM instance.

 

If you do not want to divide system privileges access into separate operating system groups, then you can designate one operating system group as the group whose members are granted access as OSDBA, OSOPER, OSASM, and OSDBA for ASM, and OSOPER for ASM privileges. The default operating system group name for all of these is dba. You can also specify OSASM, OSDBA for ASM, and OSOPER for ASM when you perform a custom installation of ASM. Furthermore, you can specify OSDBA and OSOPER when performing a custom database installation.

Whether you create separate operating system privilege groups or use one group to provide operating system authentication for all system privileges, you should use SYSASM to connect to and administer an ASM instance. In Oracle 11g release 1, both SYSASM and SYSDBA are supported privileges; however, if you use the SYSDBA privilege to administer an ASM instance, then Oracle will write warning messages to the alert log, indicating that the SYSDBA privilege is deprecated on an ASM instance for administrative commands. In a future release, the privilege to administer an ASM instance with SYSDBA will be removed.

 

server:/app/oracle/diag/asm/+asm/+ASM/trace $ sqlplus / as sysasm;

SQL*Plus: Release 11.1.0.7.0 – Production on Fri Dec 12 14:13:42 2008

Copyright (c) 1982, 2008, Oracle.  All rights reserved.

Connected to:

Oracle Database 11g Enterprise Edition Release 11.1.0.7.0 – 64bit Production

SQL> show user

USER is “SYS”

SQL> exit

Disconnected from Oracle Database 11g Enterprise Edition Release 11.1.0.7.0 – 64bit Production

server:/app/oracle/diag/asm/+asm/+ASM/trace $ id

uid=500(oracle) gid=500(dba)

 

 

One Response to “ASM – WARNING: Deprecated privilege SYSDBA for command xxx”

  1. […] Vote ASM – WARNING: Deprecated privilege SYSDBA for command xxx […]

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